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Peacock Bass Fishing Trips near Palm Beach Florida
305,19 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Did you know that you can catch exotic peacock bass near Palm Beach, Florida? Bass fishing is one of the BEST ways to adventure out and explore what South Florida has to offer. Palm Beach is located near the Lake Osborne Chain of Lakes that holds excellent freshwater fishing for peacock bass, largemouth bass, and clown knife fish. This urban fishery is truly unique as you can cruise through the canals and lakes while viewing multi-million dollar homes.Our local experts have extensive knowledge to guide you to catch numbers of fish on your fishing charter. They also can provide you with guidance on how to cast and fishing instructions for beginners or advanced angling techniques. Our trips are suited for first-timers, experienced for all levels of anglers. It is also handicap accessible. Grab your cameras, sunglasses, hat and lets have a fishing adventure of a lifetime!Our travelers also enjoyed a day at Henry Morrison Flag Museum, Lake Trail, or Worth Avenue!

Anbieter: Viator – Ein Trip...
Stand: 02.06.2020
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Peacock Bass Fishing Trip near Palm Beach
316,01 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Did you know that you can catch exotic peacock bass near Palm Beach, Florida? Bass fishing is one of the BEST ways to adventure out and explore what South Florida has to offer. Palm Beach is located near the Lake Osborne Chain of Lakes that holds excellent freshwater fishing for peacock bass, largemouth bass, and clown knife fish. This urban fishery is truly unique as you can cruise through the canals and lakes while viewing multi-million dollar homes.Our local experts have extensive knowledge to guide you to catch numbers of fish on your fishing charter. They also can provide you with guidance on how to cast and fishing instructions for beginners or advanced angling techniques. Our trips are suited for first-timers, experienced for all levels of anglers. It is also handicap accessible. Grab your cameras, sunglasses, hat and lets have a fishing adventure of a lifetime!Our travelers also enjoyed a day at Henry Morrison Flag Museum, Lake Trail, or Worth Avenue!

Anbieter: Viator – Ein Trip...
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
Peacock Bass Fishing Trips near Boca Raton
305,19 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Did you know that you can catch exotic peacock bass near Boca Raton, Florida? Bass fishing is one of the BEST ways to adventure out and explore what South Florida has to offer. Boca is located near the Lake Ida Chain of Lakes that holds excellent freshwater fishing for peacock bass, largemouth bass, and clown knife fish. This urban fishery is truly unique as you can cruise through the canals and lakes while viewing multi-million dollar homes. Our local experts have extensive knowledge to guide you to catch a number of fish on your charter. They also can provide you with guidance on how to cast and fishing instructions for beginners or advanced angling techniques. Our trips are suited for first-timers, experienced for all levels of anglers. It is also handicap accessible. Grab your cameras, sunglasses, hat, and let's have a fishing adventure of a lifetime! Our travelers also tell us how they enjoy the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, Spanish River Park or the shopping at Mizner Park!

Anbieter: Viator – Ein Trip...
Stand: 02.06.2020
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Handicap - peacock tail
1,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Handicap - peacock tail ab 1.99 EURO

Anbieter: ebook.de
Stand: 02.06.2020
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The Handicap Principle
26,90 CHF *
zzgl. 3,50 CHF Versand

Ever since Darwin, animal behaviour has intrigued and perplexed human observers. The elaborate mating rituals, lavish decorative displays, complex songs, calls, dances and many other forms of animal signalling raise fascinating questions. To what degree can animals communicate within their own species and even between species? What evolutionary purpose do such communications serve? Perhaps most importantly, what can animal signalling tell us about our own non-verbal forms of communication? In The Handicap Principle, Amotz and Ashivag Zahavi offer a unifying theory that brilliantly explains many previously baffling aspects of animal signalling and holds up a mirror in which ordinary human behaviours take on surprising new significance. The wide-ranging implications of the Zahavis' new theory make it arguably the most important advance in animal behaviour in decades. Based on 20 years of painstaking observation, the Handicap Principle illuminates an astonishing variety of signalling behaviours in animals ranging from ants and ameba to peacocks amd gazelles. Essentially, the theory asserts that for animal signals to be effective they must be reliable, and to be reliable they must impose a cost, or handicap, on the signaller. When a gazelle sights a wolf, for instance, and jumps high into the air several times before fleeing, it is signalling, in a reliable way, that it is in tip-top condition, easily able to outrun the wolf. (A human parallel occurs in children's games of tag, where faster children will often taunt their pursuer before running). By momentarily handicapping itself—expending precious time and energy in this display—the gazelle underscores the truthfulness of its signal. Such signalling, the authors suggest, serves the interests of both predator and prey, sparing each the exhaustion of a pointless chase. Similarly, the enormous cost a peacock incurs by carrying its elaborate and weighty tail-feathers, which interfere with food gathering, reliably communicates its value as a mate able to provide for its offspring. Perhaps the book's most important application of the Handicap Principle is to the evolutionary enigma of animal altruism. The authors convincingly demonstrate that when an animal acts altruistically, it handicaps itself—assumes a risk or endures a sacrifice—not primarily to benefit its kin or social group but to increase its own prestige within the group and thus signal its status as a partner or rival. Finally, the Zahavis' show how many forms of non-verbal communication among humans can also be explained by the Handicap Principle. Indeed, the authors suggest that non-verbal signals—tones of voice, facial expressions, body postures—are quite often more reliable indicators of our intentions than is language. Elegantly written, exhaustively researched, and consistently enlivened by equal measures of insight and example, The Handicap Principle illuminates virtually every kind of animal communication. It not only allows us to hear what animals are saying to each other—and to understand why they are saying it—but also to see the enormously important role non-verbal behaviour plays in human communication.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
The Handicap Principle
19,90 CHF *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Ever since Darwin, animal behavior has intrigued and perplexed human observers. The elaborate mating rituals, lavish decorative displays, complex songs, calls, dances and many other forms of animal signaling raise fascinating questions. To what degree can animals communicate within their own species and even between species? What evolutionary purpose do such communications serve? Perhaps most importantly, what can animal signaling tell us about our own non-verbal forms of communication? In The Handicap Principle, Amotz and Ashivag Zahavi offer a unifying theory that brilliantly explains many previously baffling aspects of animal signaling and holds up a mirror in which ordinary human behaviors take on surprising new significance. The wide-ranging implications of the Zahavis' new theory make it arguably the most important advance in animal behavior in decades. Based on 20 years of painstaking observation, the Handicap Principle illuminates an astonishing variety of signaling behaviors in animals ranging from ants and ameba to peacocks and gazelles. Essentially, the theory asserts that for animal signals to be effective they must be reliable, and to be reliable they must impose a cost, or handicap, on the signaler. When a gazelle sights a wolf, for instance, and jumps high into the air several times before fleeing, it is signaling, in a reliable way, that it is in tip-top condition, easily able to outrun the wolf. (A human parallel occurs in children's games of tag, where faster children will often taunt their pursuer before running). By momentarily handicapping itself--expending precious time and energy in this display--the gazelle underscores the truthfulness of its signal. Such signaling, the authors suggest, serves the interests of both predator and prey, sparing each the exhaustion of a pointless chase. Similarly, the enormous cost a peacock incurs by carrying its elaborate and weighty tail-feathers, which interfere with food gathering, reliably communicates its value as a mate able to provide for its offspring. Perhaps the book's most important application of the Handicap Principle is to the evolutionary enigma of animal altruism. The authors convincingly demonstrate that when an animal acts altruistically, it handicaps itself--assumes a risk or endures a sacrifice--not primarily to benefit its kin or social group but to increase its own prestige within the group and thus signal its status as a partner or rival. Finally, the Zahavis' show how many forms of non-verbal communication among humans can also be explained by the Handicap Principle. Indeed, the authors suggest that non-verbal signals--tones of voice, facial expressions, body postures--are quite often more reliable indicators of our intentions than is language. Elegantly written, exhaustively researched, and consistently enlivened by equal measures of insight and example, The Handicap Principle illuminates virtually every kind of animal communication. It not only allows us to hear what animals are saying to each other--and to understand why they are saying it--but also to see the enormously important role non-verbal behavior plays in human communication.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
The Handicap Principle
24,99 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Ever since Darwin, animal behaviour has intrigued and perplexed human observers. The elaborate mating rituals, lavish decorative displays, complex songs, calls, dances and many other forms of animal signalling raise fascinating questions. To what degree can animals communicate within their own species and even between species? What evolutionary purpose do such communications serve? Perhaps most importantly, what can animal signalling tell us about our own non-verbal forms of communication? In The Handicap Principle, Amotz and Ashivag Zahavi offer a unifying theory that brilliantly explains many previously baffling aspects of animal signalling and holds up a mirror in which ordinary human behaviours take on surprising new significance. The wide-ranging implications of the Zahavis' new theory make it arguably the most important advance in animal behaviour in decades. Based on 20 years of painstaking observation, the Handicap Principle illuminates an astonishing variety of signalling behaviours in animals ranging from ants and ameba to peacocks amd gazelles. Essentially, the theory asserts that for animal signals to be effective they must be reliable, and to be reliable they must impose a cost, or handicap, on the signaller. When a gazelle sights a wolf, for instance, and jumps high into the air several times before fleeing, it is signalling, in a reliable way, that it is in tip-top condition, easily able to outrun the wolf. (A human parallel occurs in children's games of tag, where faster children will often taunt their pursuer before running). By momentarily handicapping itself—expending precious time and energy in this display—the gazelle underscores the truthfulness of its signal. Such signalling, the authors suggest, serves the interests of both predator and prey, sparing each the exhaustion of a pointless chase. Similarly, the enormous cost a peacock incurs by carrying its elaborate and weighty tail-feathers, which interfere with food gathering, reliably communicates its value as a mate able to provide for its offspring. Perhaps the book's most important application of the Handicap Principle is to the evolutionary enigma of animal altruism. The authors convincingly demonstrate that when an animal acts altruistically, it handicaps itself—assumes a risk or endures a sacrifice—not primarily to benefit its kin or social group but to increase its own prestige within the group and thus signal its status as a partner or rival. Finally, the Zahavis' show how many forms of non-verbal communication among humans can also be explained by the Handicap Principle. Indeed, the authors suggest that non-verbal signals—tones of voice, facial expressions, body postures—are quite often more reliable indicators of our intentions than is language. Elegantly written, exhaustively researched, and consistently enlivened by equal measures of insight and example, The Handicap Principle illuminates virtually every kind of animal communication. It not only allows us to hear what animals are saying to each other—and to understand why they are saying it—but also to see the enormously important role non-verbal behaviour plays in human communication.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot
The Handicap Principle
17,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Ever since Darwin, animal behavior has intrigued and perplexed human observers. The elaborate mating rituals, lavish decorative displays, complex songs, calls, dances and many other forms of animal signaling raise fascinating questions. To what degree can animals communicate within their own species and even between species? What evolutionary purpose do such communications serve? Perhaps most importantly, what can animal signaling tell us about our own non-verbal forms of communication? In The Handicap Principle, Amotz and Ashivag Zahavi offer a unifying theory that brilliantly explains many previously baffling aspects of animal signaling and holds up a mirror in which ordinary human behaviors take on surprising new significance. The wide-ranging implications of the Zahavis' new theory make it arguably the most important advance in animal behavior in decades. Based on 20 years of painstaking observation, the Handicap Principle illuminates an astonishing variety of signaling behaviors in animals ranging from ants and ameba to peacocks and gazelles. Essentially, the theory asserts that for animal signals to be effective they must be reliable, and to be reliable they must impose a cost, or handicap, on the signaler. When a gazelle sights a wolf, for instance, and jumps high into the air several times before fleeing, it is signaling, in a reliable way, that it is in tip-top condition, easily able to outrun the wolf. (A human parallel occurs in children's games of tag, where faster children will often taunt their pursuer before running). By momentarily handicapping itself--expending precious time and energy in this display--the gazelle underscores the truthfulness of its signal. Such signaling, the authors suggest, serves the interests of both predator and prey, sparing each the exhaustion of a pointless chase. Similarly, the enormous cost a peacock incurs by carrying its elaborate and weighty tail-feathers, which interfere with food gathering, reliably communicates its value as a mate able to provide for its offspring. Perhaps the book's most important application of the Handicap Principle is to the evolutionary enigma of animal altruism. The authors convincingly demonstrate that when an animal acts altruistically, it handicaps itself--assumes a risk or endures a sacrifice--not primarily to benefit its kin or social group but to increase its own prestige within the group and thus signal its status as a partner or rival. Finally, the Zahavis' show how many forms of non-verbal communication among humans can also be explained by the Handicap Principle. Indeed, the authors suggest that non-verbal signals--tones of voice, facial expressions, body postures--are quite often more reliable indicators of our intentions than is language. Elegantly written, exhaustively researched, and consistently enlivened by equal measures of insight and example, The Handicap Principle illuminates virtually every kind of animal communication. It not only allows us to hear what animals are saying to each other--and to understand why they are saying it--but also to see the enormously important role non-verbal behavior plays in human communication.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 02.06.2020
Zum Angebot